Raging Giuliani destroys Obama's "see no Islam" policy

This is a must-watch, breakthrough speech that literally SCREAMS questions at Obama, asking if he is stupid, asking if he really loves America, asking him to acknowledge that Islamic extremism actually exists, and to wake up to the dangers of Iran.

Rudy Giuliani gets full marks for emotional content, but maybe less for intellectual content. My comments below.


Good questions by Giuliani, but they miss the key point slightly.

Obama cannot do what is necessary to defend America i.e. to acknowledge that Islam is predisposed towards a violent interpretation (far more so than other religions).

He can't do that because of the implications that follow (a) it implies that the terrorists might be true Muslims which implies that (b) moderate Muslims might be ignorant fools about Islam and (c) logically we should stop all Muslim immigration.

Obama can't do any of those things because his identity is partly Muslim (due to his family heritage, his Arabic middle name, childhood in Indonesia, Pakistani college friends, travel to Pakistan, etc).

Muslims are Obama's family and friends. To acknowledge that Islam might be violent, would be humiliating for all moderate Muslims, and for Obama with his Muslim heritage. He will never do that.

This is what happens when you elect a president with DIVIDED loyalties.

Does Obama love America? Yeah, in some ways. (He loves non-white America). But he also loves Muslims and, in this case, he is putting the feelings of moderate Muslims above the security of America.

In the interests of not offending moderate Muslims, Obama cannot identify the enemy and cannot begin to defeat it.

Obama is the president of moderate Muslims, he is not the president of America.

Hence Obama deflects away from Islam with talk of the Crusades and the universality of violence. It's all a distraction. Meanwhile the Islamic threat grows everywhere.

In “Audacity of Hope” Obama wrote: “I will stand with them [Muslims] should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.”

He wasn't kidding. His loyalty to Muslims comes at the expense of US national security.

File under: divided loyalties.

Antony Flew quote on Islam

Antony Flew (1923 – 2010) was a British philosopher.



From WikiIslam: Quotations on Islam from Notable Non-Muslims:
I would never regard Islam with anything but horror and fear because it is fundamentally committed to conquering the world for Islam... it is, I think, best described in a Marxian way as the uniting and justifying ideology of Arab imperialism. Between the New Testament and the Qur'an there is (as it is customary to say when making such comparisons) no comparison. Whereas markets can be found for books on reading the Bible as literature, to read the Qur'an is a penance rather than a pleasure. There is no order or development in its subject matter.... The Prophet, though gifted in the arts of persuasion and clearly a considerable military leader, was both doubtfully literate and certainly ill-informed about the contents of the Old Testament and about several matters of which God, if not even the least informed of the Prophet’s contemporaries, must have been cognizant... one thing I’ll say in this comparison is that, for goodness sake, Jesus is an enormously attractive charismatic figure, which the Prophet of Islam most emphatically is not.[12]

The Koran calls for belief and consequent obedience. It is, surely, calculated to inspire fear, indeed abject terror, rather than love.[13]
File under: abject terror.

Obama: Don't Think of a Uniquely Violent Religion

So, Obama made a crude comparison between ISIS and the Crusades which shocked and confused a lot of people. Why would he do this? It's simple, it's a distraction. With all the rising tide of Islamic violence in the Middle East, and Western countries, you might be tempted to think there is something uniquely violent in Islam.

And that's exactly why Obama deflects your attention to the Crusades:

"And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ... So this is not unique to one group or one religion".


He doesn't want you to think this violence is unique to Islam. Why? Because Obama's identity is partly Muslim. He comes from a Muslim family, he lived in Muslim countries, and has an Arab middle name.

And what might happen if we open the Koran and read it for ourselves? We might find that the terrorists have a very credible interpretation of Islam, whereas the moderates have the weaker interpretation.

And that would be humiliating for all moderate Muslims, and for Obama with his Muslim heritage.

We know from Obama's speeches to Muslims, and his outreach through NASA, that his overriding goal is to make Muslims FEEL PROUD of themselves, to raise their heads high.

But investigating Islam risks exposing moderate Muslims to the humiliation that (a) the terrorists might be the true Muslims and thus (b) moderate Muslims might be ignorant fools, and flag bearers for a truly repulsive head-chopping religion.

That would take thin-skinned Obama and his Muslim buddies back to being humiliated, the very thing he's trying to run away from.

But the problem with saying "don't think this is unique to Islam", is that you've mentioned the elephant in the room, and you've instantly brought everyone's attention to it.

Remarks by the President at National Prayer Breakfast:
But part of what I want to touch on today is the degree to which we've seen professions of faith used both as an instrument of great good, but also twisted and misused in the name of evil.

As we speak, around the world, we see faith inspiring people to lift up one another...


But we also see faith being twisted and distorted, used as a wedge -- or, worse, sometimes used as a weapon. From a school in Pakistan to the streets of Paris, we have seen violence and terror perpetrated by those who profess to stand up for faith, their faith, professed to stand up for Islam, but, in fact, are betraying it. We see ISIL, a brutal, vicious death cult that, in the name of religion, carries out unspeakable acts of barbarism -- terrorizing religious minorities like the Yezidis, subjecting women to rape as a weapon of war, and claiming the mantle of religious authority for such actions.

We see sectarian war in Syria, the murder of Muslims and Christians in Nigeria, religious war in the Central African Republic, a rising tide of anti-Semitism and hate crimes in Europe, so often perpetrated in the name of religion.

So how do we, as people of faith, reconcile these realities -- the profound good, the strength, the tenacity, the compassion and love that can flow from all of our faiths, operating alongside those who seek to hijack religious for their own murderous ends?

Humanity has been grappling with these questions throughout human history. And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ. In our home country, slavery and Jim Crow all too often was justified in the name of Christ. Michelle and I returned from India -- an incredible, beautiful country, full of magnificent diversity -- but a place where, in past years, religious faiths of all types have, on occasion, been targeted by other peoples of faith, simply due to their heritage and their beliefs -- acts of intolerance that would have shocked Gandhiji, the person who helped to liberate that nation.

So this is not unique to one group or one religion. There is a tendency in us, a sinful tendency that can pervert and distort our faith. In today’s world, when hate groups have their own Twitter accounts and bigotry can fester in hidden places in cyberspace, it can be even harder to counteract such intolerance. But God compels us to try. And in this mission, I believe there are a few principles that can guide us, particularly those of us who profess to believe.


And, first, we should start with some basic humility. I believe that the starting point of faith is some doubt -- not being so full of yourself and so confident that you are right and that God speaks only to us, and doesn’t speak to others, that God only cares about us and doesn’t care about others, that somehow we alone are in possession of the truth.

Our job is not to ask that God respond to our notion of truth -- our job is to be true to Him, His word, and His commandments. And we should assume humbly that we’re confused and don’t always know what we’re doing and we’re staggering and stumbling towards Him, and have some humility in that process. And that means we have to speak up against those who would misuse His name to justify oppression, or violence, or hatred with that fierce certainty. No God condones terror. No grievance justifies the taking of innocent lives, or the oppression of those who are weaker or fewer in number.

And so, as people of faith, we are summoned to push back against those who try to distort our religion -- any religion -- for their own nihilistic ends...

But part of humility is also recognizing in modern, complicated, diverse societies, the functioning of these rights, the concern for the protection of these rights calls for each of us to exercise civility and restraint and judgment. And if, in fact, we defend the legal right of a person to insult another’s religion, we’re equally obligated to use our free speech to condemn such insults -- (applause) -- and stand shoulder-to-shoulder with religious communities, particularly religious minorities who are the targets of such attacks. Just because you have the right to say something doesn’t mean the rest of us shouldn’t question those who would insult others in the name of free speech. Because we know that our nations are stronger when people of all faiths feel that they are welcome, that they, too, are full and equal members of our countries...

And, finally, let’s remember that if there is one law that we can all be most certain of that seems to bind people of all faiths, and people who are still finding their way towards faith but have a sense of ethics and morality in them -- that one law, that Golden Rule that we should treat one another as we wish to be treated. The Torah says “Love thy neighbor as yourself.” In Islam, there is a Hadith that states: "None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.” The Holy Bible tells us to “put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.” Put on love.

Whatever our beliefs, whatever our traditions, we must seek to be instruments of peace, and bringing light where there is darkness, and sowing love where there is hatred...

If we are properly humble, if we drop to our knees on occasion, we will acknowledge that we never fully know God’s purpose. We can never fully fathom His amazing grace. “We see through a glass, darkly” -- grappling with the expanse of His awesome love. But even with our limits, we can heed that which is required: To do justice, and love kindness, and walk humbly with our God...
File under: don't think of an elephant.

Does Islam forbid the burning of captives?

David Wood shows how Mohammed and several early Muslim leaders used fire to kill or torture (in addition to the usual head-chopping) so don't be surprised when ISIS does likewise.


File under: "I have been made victorious through terror".

Surfing break ...

Completely insane surfing off the coast of Western Australia, but mesmerising to watch.